Eagle Mountain

I’ve waited and waited for a sunny day so I could take a picture of the range of hills called Eagle Mountain. Today I finally gave up and took several pictures anyway. The arrow points to roughly to where the road starts up, and the road continues on past the right edge of the picture a little ways.

It’s a sad time now where Eagle Mountain’s concerned.

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A strong thunderstorm early last summer washed out deep gullies in the road up the first hill. There is the option of going in from the opposite end of the road, which is 30 miles from here. The county doesn’t seem to be in any hurry to fix the road. Of course, I don’t blame them with all the use it gets from ATVs, off-road mudding trucks, etc. The road is roughly four miles long, — four adventurous up-and-down miles, according to the weather. The land is a mixture of private and Shawnee National Forest land. Turkey and deer hunters flock in during the hunting seasons.

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So, at this time, all I have are memories and files of pictures.

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Buffy’s look, “What’s taking you so long?

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This is a wet-weather creek, meaning the creek can be dry, shallow as above, or so high and fast there’s no crossing it.

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The creek narrows as the elevation gradually increases.

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Ripples create yellow-rimmed shadows.

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Ripples in the ice create the yellow designs and the shadows in between.

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Trees growing along the creek need a strong extensive root system. Heavy rains result in high, fast-moving water.

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Mosses and lichens are quite common on the rocky slopes.

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Yellow ochre results from the iron designs in some of the rocks.

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Obviously, there’s red ochre too.

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This was a fresh spring morning, with birds singing.

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Obviously, this was a beautiful fall day.

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This hill is around the corner in the third picture in this blog. It’s steep, rocky slope makes it difficult to climb up from any direction.

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One time Buffy and I went up to the bluff, then to the left and found these rock designs, called liesagang bands. There were so many that it was a momentous occasion, which I blogged:

 https://naturesnippets.com/2012/05/28/liesegang-bands/

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And … the walk back toward the truck.

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2 responses to this post.

  1. I’d go there just for the rocks alone. Maybe one day your son will be able to go with you.

    Reply

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