Archive for the ‘flowers’ Category

Spiderwort Still Blooms

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Spiderwort (a tradescantia species) is a native wildflower.

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A dense clump of it grows in my spring wildflower garden between a hackberry and a pine tree.

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They were given to me by my girl scout leader years and years ago. She had health problems and wanted me to have most of the flowers in her garden.

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This picture shows just how dense the flowers grow.

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I became intrigued by the shape, the color of the flowers, and with the number of those past bloom.

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Obviously, the plants insist on having a long blooming time,

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and I plan on enjoying it.

(I wrote this blog the middle of July, and the plants are still blooming.)

A Catalpa Tree

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 This catalpa tree grows near the middle of our backyard.

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For some reason it had much less flower clusters this year than usual.

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There are more flowers on the upper part of the tree than there are on the lower part.

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One pistil and two stamens form a group near the opening of the flower.

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The lined-pattern on the lower petal are like that for a reason. They guide any visitors up into the flower, and they pollinate it at the same time.

The flowers bloomed the end of May.

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I don’t know what kind of insect this is. It does have long antennae.

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I couldn’t resist the shape and contrast of this abstract design.

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The above caterpillar is younger than the one below.

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I’ve only seen one caterpillar in the last week.

Something’s Missing

There is something missing from all these pictures, except the last one …

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… Butterflies

They don’t call this butterflyweed for nothing. In a good butterfly summer, the milkweed would be covered with butterflies of all sizes and colors.

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Not this summer. I’m seeing a few dragonflies, but I haven’t seen a butterfly for weeks.

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It’s a shame. I look forward to them every summer.

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One common milkweed grows beside the old garage. At least I’ll have a place for monarch butterflies to lay eggs if they do visit here.

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Obviously, this picture wasn’t taken this summer.

They still might visit here on their migration north.

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At least aphids are hatching on the underside of a milkweed leaf.

Evening Shadows

Our house faces west, and there’s a garden site and a large farm field across the highway.

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So, we can see the sunsets when they aren’t clouded over. The lower the sun gets, the more vivid the colors turn.

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The shadows intrigue me and

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my moving rearranges them into another composition.

Trilliums in my Spring Garden

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 My spring wildflower garden grows between a pine on the left and a hackberry tree on the right. The middle tree is a sweet gum, and it grows 15 feet or so back from the garden.

(I wrote this blog around a month ago.)

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Purple trilliums (Trillium recurvatum) are the most common trillium in southern Illinois. All trilliums have parts in threes — three leaves, three petals (which stand upright) and three sepals (angling downward from the base of the flower). The purple ones grow 12- to 17 inches tall in my garden.

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White trilliums (trillium flexipes) are scattered in the woods. They grow to 14 inches tall, and are not as numerous as the purple trilliums.

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Only one yellow trillium (Trillium luteum) grows in my spring wildflower garden. It was a gift from a friend several years ago. It only stands ten inches tall and easily hides among the other trilliums.

Morning Light

The picture window by my computer faces east. Thick trees on our neighbor’s property and an old strip pit hill block any view beyond.

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The early sun creates patterns of light and shadow on the irises at the edge of my butterfly garden.

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The shadows create abstract patterns..

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Squint when looking at this flower. It enhances the design.

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   This iris was just beginning to open yesterday when I was taking pictures of the irises above. I think I’ll name it the dramatic beauty.

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I almost forgot I had this iris. What a beauty!

Winter Aconite

Winter aconites grow from tubers

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and need planted about five inches deep, from base of the tuber to the surface if of the soil.

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Just leave

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them alone and

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allow the plants to die back naturally… and the patch will spread.

I photographed these on February 19.