Archive for the ‘Spiders’ Category

Spider Egg Cases?

I’m not sure if this “line” is for spider of eggs, are spider eggs, or they have spiderlings in each small wooly mass?

These were small and tricky to photograph.

I’m not really sure what’s in the white fuzzy small masses. They don’t look like eggs to me. I wonder if each is a spider egg sac?

Composition in Green

I was walking around the backyard this morning, looking for spiders and their webs. The composition of the three or four sunlit greens was a pleasant surprise.

I didn’t expect to find such an artistic design, and one with a spider in its web.

An Aerial Record

I went out early the day before yesterday to take pictures of spider webs.

Music won’t come from this “record,” mainly because it’s a spider web.

A light breeze would flatten the web, which then reflected the colors.

Obviously, this web isn’t flat like the one above. It does reflect similar colors when the positions are right.

Long Spider Silk

A spider spun the long length of silk above. Actually, it’s all one piece.

This is the same strand of silk as the one above. A slight breeze or air movement moves it and changes how much of the silk is seen.

  The spider silk is flat and easily moves about in the slightest breeze. Movement changes its appearance.

 Each of the pictures has a short white flat strip of spider silk too. It’s in different light from the ones in the sunlight.

(The silk wasn’t twisted like in the bottom picture. I don’t know why it looks like that in the picture.)

Evening Web Building

 I became interested in spiders and their webs during the first part of September,

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when I watched an orb weaver spider weave its web in the front yard for the night. ( I watched take it down the next morning.)

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The color varied from the changing angle of the sun, the color of it and surrounding darkening colors.

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Obviously, the sun made for a dramatic picture too.

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I don’t remember if there was a breeze or not. Cars and trucks passed on the highway. I ignored them.

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I can’t explain what caused this picture to turn out like it did. It had to be a combination of the light and sudden movement to create those web shapes.

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The spider went round and round, patiently building its web.

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I almost ran out of daylight. I would’ve of liked to see what the spider caught for its evening meal.

… It had already taken the web down before I got up the next morning.

Mystery Solved

The more I researched this, the more confused I became.

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I found this web stretched in the crotch of a dead pear tree in our backyard. The day was cloudy. I had no idea what the “line” was in the center of the web.

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Then I found a smaller web in a clump of sedum. Obviously, it had the same mystery in the center of it too.

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This was an even closer shot of the center of the web. The silk was so thin it was hard to see.

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I didn’t see a spider in any of these webs until today. The bluish shape on the right, near the center of the picture moved. The spider changed its position in the web. It went out from the center and quickly back. I started taking pictures. It was almost impossible to get a focused picture with the small size of the web. My camera kept focusing on the background instead.

I found a position with the leaves behind and showing the spider. At least I solved the mystery of the spider’s location, and that the other shapes are the spider’s egg cases.

P.S. I have found many of these spider and egg cases scattered around the yard.

 

In the Rock Pile

Rocks edged all my gardens until I reduced the number of gardens and made a pile with the rocks.

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Obviously, spiders like the rock pile. The spiders living among the rocks are wolf spiders (which have a painful bite.)

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I wish I could’ve seen the spider spin this web. It’s so graceful in its simplicity.

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Some spiders will wait for passing prey in or near the mouth of the burrow.

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Taking their picture poses a problem too … they usually stay down in their tunnel.

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They do tend to blend in with their surroundings.

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Their drab coloring makes them difficult to see. They depend on camouflage for protection.

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They are nocturnal. All the webs in my rock pile are taken down every morning  and rebuilt later in the day.

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I never did get a good look at this spider … so I was never sure if this was an abdomen or egg sac.

The female carries her eggs in an egg sac, which is attached to her spinnerets. The newly-hatched young climb up on her back and stay there until they’re big enough to be on their own. I haven’t seen one with an egg sac or with young.