Posts Tagged ‘adult’

The Returning Groundhogs

My husband has been doing a lot of work in the back-back of our yard. He’s clearing out areas with young trees in vine tangles. I went out to see the recent progress.

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The groundhogs are more tolerant of us now. This adult watched me walk past on the way back to the house. (I was out enough to use the zoom).

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The first generation of young ones were tolerant too.

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We also have smaller ones. I’m not sure if there’s one or two families here now. The youngest ones have lighter gray on the sides of their head.

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There must be many interesting things to watch.

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They are curious and cautious.

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They look like their belly drags the ground when they run for the barn. They are always aware of my presence in or out of the house … and I have the impression they can see the whites of my eyes, even when I’m by the picture window.

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I think they’re cute when they sit up like this and casually look around.

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A Long Strong Storm

We had a strong storm today that lasted from 10:30 till 1:30

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There was heavy rain and a lot of thunder. The thunder actually last at least three hours after the storm ended. Light rain continued too.

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The young ground hogs didn’t seem to mind the weather. It was probably fun.

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This one kept me laughing. It was under the bench for the picnic table out of the rain, munching away.

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It looked around before

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joining the others out in the yard. It was still raining relatively hard.

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I wonder if this one was surveying its domain.

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This is the adult. I don’t know if it saw me or not. It took off for the barn as fast as it could go.

 

Lone Resident

A groundhog family lived under our barn for months. They raised four young.

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Apparently the family dispersed, and only one adult lives here now.

It looks like it plans to spend the winter here.

Feels Right At Home

The groundhog family must feel right at home now. When they first moved under the barn, they stayed close to the den. They got braver and spread around part of the back-back of our yard. The young ones generally stayed closer to the barn. Not any more.

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I looked out the picture window by my computer, and there was an adult … only it was only 20 yards from picture window where I sat.

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I thought it might possibly had been looking for an intruder in his territory.

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It headed south,

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went on the cistern,

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and rested before heading back toward the barn.

Two Immature Insects

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The larval stage of a ladybug definitely doesn’t resemble an adult ladybug.

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The pupal stage more resembles an adult.

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A stinkbug nymph is definitely more ornate

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than the adult green stinkbug.

Leaf-footed Bugs

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Earlier in the summer I couldn’t remember what would hatch from these eggs in the catalpa tree.

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Several times I found these newly-hatch nymphs and wasn’t sure of them either.

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The lower leg doesn’t show in the picture. It had what looked like the beginning leg of a leaf-footed bug.

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These gathered together in the catalpa tree yesterday. They obviously are leaf-footed bugs — see the widened area on the lower hind leg. Their wings aren’t fully developed.

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This picture of an adult, and the picture above, were both taken on September 19.

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Surprise, September 25, this adult posed. It better shows all their features.

Pair Summer Tanagers

Summer tanagers usually don’t find our yard interesting enough to stay here, until this summer. It seems like weeks now that I’ve listened to their “pik-i-tuk-tuk-i-tuk” calls.

Every time the calling would continue, I’d try to locate the bird, never with any luck  until this evening.

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 I stood and stood, hunted and hunted. First I spotted the male among the masses of leaves and branches. Please excuse the quality of the pictures. I know they’re far from being good. At least I finally found one and took it’s picture in the evening light.

If you look close you can see yellow around its neck and down its breast a little. The yellow indicates it’s a young one that isn’t the total red of an adult male.

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The low evening sun made the female’s deep yellow front look slightly more orange.

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It was considerate for both birds to be in my final picture.

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The next morning the male called from the catalpa tree above where I was working. Adult scarlet tanagers are bright red with black wings. Call notes easily differentiate the summer from the scarlet tanager. Summer tanagers give “pik-i-tuk-i-tuk” calls, and their song resembles a robin. The scarlet tanagers repeat “chip-burr” calls, and their song sounds like a robin with a sore throat.