Posts Tagged ‘bluebirds’

Returning Bluebirds

The bluebirds moved into my yard recently.

They wouldn’t show up if it weren’t for their bright colors. They can be easy to see if they’re perched just right in the sunlight. They do brighten up a person’s day.

This picture was taken the same day as the ones of the bluebird. I can’t explain why the picture turned out like it did. The white lines in the foreground are strands of spider silk. The other finer strands are part of a spider web. What I don’t understand is the tiny round spots?

Advertisements

Cooperative Bluebird

This bluebird wasn’t hidden as much as it thought it was.

He reverses the direction for this picture.

The pale rust and pale blue blend in with its surroundings (squint and look at him.)

A different angle changes the shadow on the bluebirds.

Shadows help the bluebird to blend in with its surroundings.

Pear Condemenium

This pear tree died several years ago,

I left it for a perch for any bird that might be interested in nesting there.

Obviously, it has had previous occupants.

Then today, three or four bluebirds showed interest in the dead tree.

I started getting excited.

They checked the dead tree and its surroundings.

 I was sure they would nest in such a “perfect” place.

Well, it turned out they didn’t stay and use any of the holes for nesting.

I still keep my fingers crossed and hope they … or another pair return.

Sumac Berries

I transplanted 2 sumac trees in the lower part of our yard several years ago. They were planted especially for feeding the birds in the winter.

The only reason I think they’re healthier looking than most plants is because it’s lower back there, and they’re down from the septic field. It didn’t look like the birds have started eating them yet.

Droopy leaves on this sumac show signs of stress from the extreme heat and drought. I also wonder about the overall tree drooping.

All the berries are gone on the wild cherry trees in the yard. Leaves on all the hackberry trees are yellowish and wilty looking. Their berries are a strange color and aren’t ripe yet. I wonder if they’ll even ripen.

A flock of cedar waxwings will move in an area in the winter and stay there until all the berries are gone. Robins and bluebirds eat berries in the winter too.