Posts Tagged ‘Cooper’s hawk’

Visiting Coopers Hawk

There’s nothing like a close-up seat for viewing a visiting bird.

This visitor was a female Cooper’s hawk.

The females are bigger than the males.

This one spent time checking for any visitors in the yard.

Apparently, the large oak tree across the highway was the main tree magnet.

This last picture was taken after the clouds thinned later in the  afternoon.

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A Cooper’s Hawk

Our days have been cloudy and drab for weeks.

I sat in the recliner beside the window in the livingroom.

I had to turn around a little more than usual to see in the north side of the large oak.

… and there was a Cooper’s hawk, searching the limbs for birds to eat.

Cooper’s hawks are accipters — meaning they eat other birds. They’re also larger than the sharp-shinned hawks.

I  sat in the rocker-recliner beside the window. The males are considerably smaller than the female Cooper’s hawk, and the ends of their tails are squared.

The hawk landed on this branch and stayed there for quite a while.

It was a Cooper’s hawk.

(All these pictures were taken of the same hawk)

The huge oak grows across the highway from our house and can be a bird magnet.

A Visiting Cooper’s Hawk

A Cooper’s hawk decided to perch in the sweet gum tree in our front yard.

Its brown pattern blended in with its surroundings.

Then it decided to perch on a sign across the highway, beside our neighbor’s barn. It was a cloudy day with a light snow falling.

The Cooper hawk’s tail has a squared-off end, where a  sharp-shinned hawk’s has a rounded tail.

The light snow was enough that I couldn’t get good clear pictures. This picture better shows the squared end of the Cooper hawk’s tail.

 The day remained cloudy with an occasional mist. The hawk came and went a few times.

So, I might have more time to hawk watch.

The Cooper’s Hawk Came Back

The Cooper’s hawk returned to our yard this morning. It first came here on July 7 and stayed most of the time until the 19th.

Today is August 12th, and it’s back.

It seems to be getting used to our backyard.

When it’s in the yard, its presence reduces the number of birds in the area.

A few birds still continue to visit our yard.

… The hawk just flew across our backyard. I hadn’t seen it all day.

  It will be interesting to see how long it stays in the neighborhood this time.

You can tell by this picture that it can easily stay hidden in the thicket in the back corner of our yard, unless it flies.

Backyard Surprise

We woke to little excitement a few mornings ago.

A small bird was determined to run a larger bird out of our backyard, and keep it out.

  The rounded shape of the end of the hawk’s tail identified it as a Cooper’s hawk (the top picture better shows the rounded end of its tail). Sharp shinned hawks are smaller, and the end of their tail is squared.

I could only see the dark shape of the hawk from the distance, and had to take pictures from in the house.

The smaller bird repeatedly flew at the hawk and continually dived at its back. This went on for most of the day.

  The hawk wasn’t fazed by the repeated attempts.

 The hawk stayed in our yard 2 1/2 days. The other birds didn’t like it and made their opinions known.

 This is 3 days later,  and the hawk’s staying here in our yard, hunting for birds.