Posts Tagged ‘green’

A Different Spider Web

This first picture fascinated me because of the green spider.

I have no explanation for the webs in the next two pictures.

Maybe they were having a “spider’s disagreement.”

Or could have been trying to build a different style of web.

It was fascinating whatever the reason and the design.

 

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Evening Light

I just found out from my son that I goofed on the identification of this insect. It’s a mantis fly, not a praying mantis. I didn’t even know there was such an insect. The abdomen shape differs between the two. The veining of the wings of a mantis fly’s wings is square and is long in a praying mantis’).

I usually see green or brown praying mantises,

… and this one turned out to be a mantis fly.

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This one doesn’t fit in either color category.

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It looks like it molted recently and is waiting for its exoskeleton to dry.

Finally, a Dragonfly

A dragonfly finally landed where I could take pictures of it. Their numbers have been low this spring. Most of the few that I have seen didn’t land or pose for pictures.

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Eastern Pondhawk (Erythemis simpliciollis)

They are one of the most common dragonflies here in southern Illinois. The females are green and the males blue.

Cedar Apple Rust

The theme of this cloudy day was green. Very little bloomed.

IMG_8674 red

We’re between the early bloomers and the next wave of seasonal color.

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The orange, though small, made a bold statement.

IMG_8661 red

The cedar apple rust grew on a young cedar tree. I’ve known it’s called cedar apple rust; I just never knew why (or even thought about it) until researching for this blog.

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Cedar apple rust is a fungal disease on apple trees. Cedar apple rust requires apple trees too to complete its life cycle.The brown galls overwinter on the cedar trees. During moist weather in the spring, the galls produce jelly-like horns. The rest of the information on the galls’ life cycle scrambles my artistic brain.

I enjoyed the aesthetic qualities of this find.

Praying Mantis

I just learned something I didn’t know:

 brown praying mantids are found in dry environments,

and green praying mantids are found in wet enviroments.

So, how do I explain the color of the one below that I just photographed this evening?

Adults molt (shed their exoskeleton) up to ten times until they’re full grown. So, I figure this one must have just shed and will return to the its normal color soon.

(All the pictures in this blog were taken in my yard in previous years, except the one above.)

We also have Chinese mantids in southern Illinois.

I came across this picture of a mantis nymph.

My sons would get in trouble when they were young and brought critters of all kinds in the house. This time, though, it was me who didn’t know what I’d brought home. (This was many years ago.)

 I placed one on the windowsill over the kitchen sink.

The other one went on the portable dishwasher.

Well, one morning I got up and found my window sill a busy place with a LOT of newly hatched praying mantids! And how do you round up so many tiny critters? (The top egg mass is from a praying mantis, the one above is from Chinese mantid.)

A few days later, I got up and found baby mantids on and all over inside of the dishwasher.

I couldn’t blame anybody but myself. Obviously, I won’t do that again.