Posts Tagged ‘hackberry tree’

Early in the Morning

My morning started with birds visiting our yard. The sun cleared the hill behind our house, and the birds became more active. I started taking pictures as the sun cleared the strip pit behind our house. I took pictures of the sunlight brightening the emerging leaves in the hackberry tree, the pine and the sweetgum trees.

The sunlight lit the few strands of spider silk and changed their colors to mostly orange.

I like the depth of the layered image of branches and new flowers emerging among them.

 

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Miniscule Comes to Mind

  I walk loops around our backyard for the exercise, and so I can watch for any photographic opportunity.

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Lichens are common on both live and dead wood.

The Whitewash lichen (Phlyctis argena) above is similar to Common Button lichen (Buellia stillingiana), which has more black dots. The spores are produced in the dots, called the apothecia.

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I rotated this and the next picture, because it makes it easier to see the lichens.

Candleflame lichen (Candelaria concolor) is the yellowgreen one on the bark of a hackberry tree. Research online shows that its color can vary.

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My Lichens of the North Woods book gives 0.1-0.5 mm for the width of the its lobes!

Berry Eaters

I sat, working at the computer. The picture window to my left offers a view of our backyard.

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The rain stopped. Bird activity increased on the cistern. The bird in the front is a cedar waxwing and the other a robin. Fruit that fell from the nearby hackberry tree attracted their attention.

Cedar waxwings travel in small flocks, looking for berries to eat. Their call is a faint high pitched whistle.

Artistic Combination

I walked around our backyard this morning taking pictures of spider webs.

          I usually look at the pictures in the computer when I come in from photographing the webs.  Today I waited.

……… and I had such a pleasant surprise when I saw the combination of elements in this picture.

The unusual bark on the right is on a hackberry tree. The raised projections are called “corky warts.”

 

Chipping Sparrow

I sat near the picture window beside my computer.

A chipping sparrow started flitting around in the hackberry tree, and then

it seemed to be looking for something on the ground … I figure food.

It continued searching for seeds before it flew off to where I couldn’t see it.

A Snout Butterfly

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A snout butterfly (Libytheana carinenta) flew into my butterfly garden and landed near me.

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It’s obvious it got its name from the long labial palps (mouth parts on either side of its proboscis).

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It looks like it’s been a while since the ragged butterfly emerged.

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They have a 1 3/8 to 2 inch wingspan and lay their eggs in hackberry trees (several grow in our yard.)

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 It flew away to I don’t know where.

A Morning Surprise … a Big Surprise!

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   I recently started going for mornings walks around our backyard about 7 a.m. to look for spider webs.

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   Then Sunday morning (October 3) I woke to a dense fog. It didn’t take me long to get outside with my camera. I couldn’t see the back of the yard from the house. We have two acres.

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Obviously, there were the “common-shaped” webs. I found ones in all sizes, from the small  ones to ones from three feet in diameter.

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Some weren’t completely finished. This one looked like it came apart near the center.

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This web was in the magnolia tree. It looks like a tangled “mess” that would capture prey.

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How can this web hold its shape with all the multi-sized drops lining every strand?

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I wonder how long silk will remain from the web.

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I saw a few webs like this one up to three feet tall.

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This web is designed to capture insects that enter the separated area.

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I wondered if this web was completed or if it was what remained.

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The hackberry tree above appeared practically covered with webs, especially at the top.

These are only a few of the 240 pictures I took that morning!

What I don’t understand now is, “where did all the spiders go?” Where had all the spiders been before this web-a-thon?  I only found three webs the next morning and one this morning.