Posts Tagged ‘hackberry tree’

Artistic Combination

I walked around our backyard this morning taking pictures of spider webs.

          I usually look at the pictures in the computer when I come in from photographing the webs.  Today I waited.

……… and I had such a pleasant surprise when I saw the combination of elements in this picture.

The unusual bark on the right is on a hackberry tree. The raised projections are called “corky warts.”

 

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Chipping Sparrow

I sat near the picture window beside my computer.

A chipping sparrow started flitting around in the hackberry tree, and then

it seemed to be looking for something on the ground … I figure food.

It continued searching for seeds before it flew off to where I couldn’t see it.

A Snout Butterfly

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A snout butterfly (Libytheana carinenta) flew into my butterfly garden and landed near me.

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It’s obvious it got its name from the long labial palps (mouth parts on either side of its proboscis).

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It looks like it’s been a while since the ragged butterfly emerged.

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They have a 1 3/8 to 2 inch wingspan and lay their eggs in hackberry trees (several grow in our yard.)

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 It flew away to I don’t know where.

A Morning Surprise … a Big Surprise!

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   I recently started going for mornings walks around our backyard about 7 a.m. to look for spider webs.

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   Then Sunday morning (October 3) I woke to a dense fog. It didn’t take me long to get outside with my camera. I couldn’t see the back of the yard from the house. We have two acres.

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Obviously, there were the “common-shaped” webs. I found ones in all sizes, from the small  ones to ones from three feet in diameter.

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Some weren’t completely finished. This one looked like it came apart near the center.

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This web was in the magnolia tree. It looks like a tangled “mess” that would capture prey.

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How can this web hold its shape with all the multi-sized drops lining every strand?

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I wonder how long silk will remain from the web.

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I saw a few webs like this one up to three feet tall.

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This web is designed to capture insects that enter the separated area.

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I wondered if this web was completed or if it was what remained.

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The hackberry tree above appeared practically covered with webs, especially at the top.

These are only a few of the 240 pictures I took that morning!

What I don’t understand now is, “where did all the spiders go?” Where had all the spiders been before this web-a-thon?  I only found three webs the next morning and one this morning.

Line Forms to the Right

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Tis’ the season for sapflow butterflies to  visit rotten fruit for their meals.

The butterfly in the foreground is a tawny emperor. One of the three in the line is a tawny emperor. All the others are hackberry butterflies. They each have their proboscis down where the banana split open when I “smushed” it with my sandal. There’s two apple halves in the background.

The hackbery trees in our yard are one of the reasons we have so many hackberry and tawny emperor butterflies here at this time. Both lay their eggs in hackberry trees. A huge hackberry tree grows eight feet or so from the cistern where the butterfly are gathering, and several grow in the yard.

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The orange and black butterfly above is often called a “monarch” when, actually, it’s a viceroy. The black band on  its hindwing differentiates it from the monarch.

Tawny Emperor

Tawny Emperor (Asterocampa clyton,clyton)

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A large hackberry tree grows in the backyard, close to the house and where I can easily see it from the computer.

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Tawny emperors lay their eggs in hackberry trees. Hackberry butterflies do too. I’ve only seen one hackberry butterfly so far this year.

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  I wonder how long it will be before I see another butterfly?

What a Difference Three Days Make

Strong winds, hours of heavy snow and dropping temperatures created dramatic results

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that could be enjoyed from the picture window by my computer. (Jan 10)

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The large hackberry tree added an interesting background for some pictures.

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Ice on the window created a variety of designs

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for dramatic pictures.

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All that remains now are the icicles hanging from the gutter.

———

 And then a sunny day today (January 14) the temperature rises to 57 degrees.

Buffy and I walked a loop of the backyard. She investigated along the side of the barn until the the fox let her know she wasn’t wanted there. With the wind, she actually smelled up about half of the back-back of our yard.

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I walked right up to a crawdad mound. The hole was open, and I could see water down in there.

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The dandelion flower stood out! All other colors were winter-dull.

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Dandelion flowerheads are actually made of many yellow ray flowers. They have five tiny petals, and both male and female parts.