Posts Tagged ‘insects’

Yard Mysteries

I’ll start this blog with an …. “I have absolutely no idea what these “things” are.”

The ones in this and the next picture were all found on the outside of the south window of my bedroom.

This one was on another window. Look close at the bottom end,  and you’ll see what looks like two eyes.

This one has me stumped. It’s too small to see the details of its head. It had two teeny eyes ringed with blue.

 All these pictures were taken from inside the house. I’m assuming these were insects. I will post the blog again if I find out what these are … or if a reader knows.

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Wonders Never Cease

 Common Milkweed

Four common milkweed plants grow beside the back garage (which will be torn down this summer).

A few insects visit the flowers,

and a white crab spider hides on the underneath side of one of the leaves. The spider can change colors to match the color of the flower it’s on.

A Morning Surprise … a Big Surprise!

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   I recently started going for mornings walks around our backyard about 7 a.m. to look for spider webs.

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   Then Sunday morning (October 3) I woke to a dense fog. It didn’t take me long to get outside with my camera. I couldn’t see the back of the yard from the house. We have two acres.

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Obviously, there were the “common-shaped” webs. I found ones in all sizes, from the small  ones to ones from three feet in diameter.

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Some weren’t completely finished. This one looked like it came apart near the center.

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This web was in the magnolia tree. It looks like a tangled “mess” that would capture prey.

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How can this web hold its shape with all the multi-sized drops lining every strand?

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I wonder how long silk will remain from the web.

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I saw a few webs like this one up to three feet tall.

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This web is designed to capture insects that enter the separated area.

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I wondered if this web was completed or if it was what remained.

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The hackberry tree above appeared practically covered with webs, especially at the top.

These are only a few of the 240 pictures I took that morning!

What I don’t understand now is, “where did all the spiders go?” Where had all the spiders been before this web-a-thon?  I only found three webs the next morning and one this morning.

No Name Dragonfly

For some reason, I find dragonflies that I’m unable to identify.

I still enjoy them immensely.

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This one liked the exposed perch of the copper trellis.

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The wing veins look so delicate and intricate … and downright fascinating.

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The dragonfly and damselfly numbers are low this summer. At least I can see a few daily, not like the butterflies … I haven’t seen one in the last few weeks.

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It would fly out to capture tiny flying insects.

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This angle shows all the details of its body except the dark tips of its wings.

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This picture shows a lot of details of its anatomy. Interesting. I couldn’t find out what the parts are that I see in its head.

 

 

Moth Mullein

This is my last groundhog blog. They moved out sometime yesterday afternoon. There’s two of the few pictures I took of them yesterday morning at the end of this blog.

I’ve been taking ground hog pictures several times a day, since the first of May.

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During this time there’s been a plant in my line vision that was often between me and the groundhogs. I thought it was a moth mullein (Verbascum blattaria), but wasn’t sure. Two of them grow beside the moon garden, the only two in the yard.

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They have finally started blooming.

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The flowers are absolutely beautiful inside, with so many colors to attract the insects.

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They have such a tall inflorescence, that they will bloom for a while. Luckily, the groundhogs don’t show any interest in them.

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I was working on this blog, looked out the window and there was a young groundhog.

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It went back under the barn, and one of the adults came partially out, probably  to see of I was still around.


Both of these pictures were taken at noon yestererday.

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As you can tell, they were growing like “kids” do.

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And they liked to play.

They will be missed.

Butterflyweed

I don’t feel right not posting a blog about the butterflyweed  (Asclepias tuberosa) in my garden, even if it is past bloom.

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These pictures were taken between June 19 and July 6.

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Butterfly numbers have been much lower this summer.

 

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The butterflyweed would normally be a hub of activity.

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A large milkweed bug or two stayed among the flowers.

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The caterpillar numbers remained low too.

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Predators were present too.

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The hornet apparently found plenty of small insects to feed on.

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The butterflyweed was reduced to this by July 6.

An Unidentified Insect

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I’m not sure of the identity of this insect that landed on the red honeysuckle.

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If I had to make a guess, I’d say, “crane fly.”

After yesterday’s storms, I wasn’t expecting to see many insects.