Posts Tagged ‘larva’

A Pruner, a Girdler and a ?

IMG_9257 red

We have a dawn redwood tree in our backyard

IMG_9252 red

that my mother gave us years ago. These pictures were taken the end of November.

IMG_9231 crop red

I found several twigs on the ground under the tree.

IMG_9271 red

What “cut” the twigs from the tree, and how did they do it to make the end look like that?

IMG_3207 crop red

There are tree pruner insects. A full-grown twig pruner chews through the wood from the inside out. This leaves a smooth cut on the inside of the twig. The ragged edge results from the twig breaking.

IMG_3244 crop red

This broken twig resulted from a female tree girdler chewing a v-shaped groove around the twig. The small larva overwintered in the fallen twig.

IMG_9306 crop red

The ones off the redwood tree don’t look like the work of a girdler or a pruner.

IMG_9311 crop red

It will probably remain a mystery … unless I find another clue in the future.

 

 

Just Identified

I took these pictures on July 8 and

IMG_3203 crop one

didn’t blog them because I couldn’t identify the insect.

IMG_3203 crop two

Then, this morning, I happened upon a website that I immediately bookmarked.

 insectidentification.org

It has insect identifications by state.

IMG_3205 crop

Banded longhorn beetles are often seen eating flower pollen.

IMG_3208 crop

 Females lay their eggs on dead or dying trees. The larva hatch and then bore into the wood, where they live for 1-3 years. After pupating, the adults chew their way out of the tree and and seek mates to continue the cycle.

Unusual Leaf Miner

IMG_6670 red

More typical leaf miner “trails” look like the ones above in a catalpa leaf.

IMG_5174 crop alt red

 Obviously, this poison ivy plant stood out with such an unusual leaf miner design.

IMG_5176 crop alt one

A leaf miner is the larva of an insect that lives and develops inside a leaf. This type of mine is called a “blotch mine.” Mornings it looked like it had condensation in the mine, that wasn’t there in the evenings.

IMG_5176 crop alt arrow copy

If you look close, you can see a tiny larva.

IMG_5233 alt red

I was actually able to easily identify it online. It’s a poison ivy leaf miner (Cameraria guttifinitella).

The cause of the dark spots or the long crease of the upper surface remain a mystery.

Leaf Miner

(I’m BACK!!! Finally. It turned out my blog site problem was my browser. I am of the over-60 club and didn’t grow up with computers. They still intimate me on certain things. Anyway, I am celebrating today!!!)

———-moths

Leaf miner patterns on leaves always fascinate me — how could a “critter” that small even exists?

IMG_3723 red

The larvae of leaf miners feed on the cells inside the leaf, leaving a “trail” as they go. Feeding in the leaf protects them from predators.

The leaf above is off a lilac bush that I found recently.

IMG_6670 red

I photographed this cottonwood leaf in August.  If you look close, you can see where a tunnel started in the lower left side of the picture. Then you can follow it as the larva ate and grew. Leaf miners can be larvae of moths, sawfies and flies.