Posts Tagged ‘lichens’

“Blue Crystal and other Discoveries

A “blue crystal” … I’m not sure what the light’s reflecting from.

This piece of wood’s mostly covered with a variety of lichens and a couple of teeny pale red mushrooms.

A yellow-bellied sapsucker went first to the pine tree. You can tell the holes they drill by the way they’re in straight and horizontal lines. Sap flows from the holes and the sap suckers feed on it.

Clouds also add a variety of their shapes

Spring’s slowly arriving, and the spiders are already beginning to work on their small

 and large webs.

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A Foliose Lichen

I find all kinds of lichens when I pick up sticks in the yard.

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The larger lichen with the leafy appearance is a foliose lichen.

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Blister lichen, with the dark disc-shaped fruiting bodies, is also a foliose lichen. The leafy part shows better in the upper right of the picture.

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The black “hairs” along the edges of the lichen are called “cilia.” I seldom see them on lichens.

Portrait of Foliose Lichen

This lichen grows on a tree in my backyard.

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It doesn’t know its name. I don’t know its name,

which in no way diminishes my enjoyment of its discovery.

Two More Lichens

This winter was so drab. Seemed like the sun seldom shone — and it wasn’t my imagination.

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I don’t burn all the sticks/small logs I find in the yard, for obvious reasons. I wonder if anything lived in the cavity of this blister lichens (Physcia stellaris)?

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here the blister lichens grew with the Candelaria concolor lichen. It commonly grows on elm, ash and sugar maple trees.

An Interesting Stick

Our weather finally turned off nice for a change, and I found myself picking up sticks in the yard.

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 I picked up a stick under the sweet gum tree and found two surprises underneath — a small shelf fungi and a slug. The shelf fungi was so small I couldn’t see if the underneath side was smooth or had pores.

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There was no shortage of lichens on the fallen wood. My Missouri book “Walk Softly Upon the Earth” calls this a blister lichen (Physcia stellaris). My “Lichens of the North Woods” book calls it a star rosette lichen.

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Then I found these yellow-green lichens.

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It looked like they’re more yellow when they were young. The black had me confused, because it looked more like a crust than like the top of the smooth black ones above.

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I do get frustrated at times when I’m trying to identify a find and can’t.

For me it’s more of a matter of learning to see, find and enjoy.

Fascinating Ice

There’s more to ice than just ice. I accidentally found a 2008 folder with 109 pictures from a serious ice storm. (Luckily, we didn’t lose power.)

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My backyard turned into a sparkling display of the many possibilities of ice. This purple coneflower seedhead took on a completely different appearance.

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Rosemary transformed into a dramatic composition.

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The fascinating thing about ice is how it distorts and reverses images. The blue sky overhead ends up reflected on the side of the ice.

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I wonder if this is where the phrase “frozen in time” came from?

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How can a uniform line of lumps form with very little underneath to create and hold them? They’re actually larger on the top side. Guess it was cold enough that the rain didn’t have time to move far after hitting the ice.

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Simple beauty formed everywhere I looked.

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The blue sky overhead and the red barn ended up reflected upside down in the ice … and the reflected snow made it look like a cloudy sky.

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I can’t tell what kind of lichens this is inside the “ice drop.”

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It’s been such a treat to relive the beauty of that ice storm.

Eagle Mountain

I’ve waited and waited for a sunny day so I could take a picture of the range of hills called Eagle Mountain. Today I finally gave up and took several pictures anyway. The arrow points to roughly to where the road starts up, and the road continues on past the right edge of the picture a little ways.

It’s a sad time now where Eagle Mountain’s concerned.

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A strong thunderstorm early last summer washed out deep gullies in the road up the first hill. There is the option of going in from the opposite end of the road, which is 30 miles from here. The county doesn’t seem to be in any hurry to fix the road. Of course, I don’t blame them with all the use it gets from ATVs, off-road mudding trucks, etc. The road is roughly four miles long, — four adventurous up-and-down miles, according to the weather. The land is a mixture of private and Shawnee National Forest land. Turkey and deer hunters flock in during the hunting seasons.

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So, at this time, all I have are memories and files of pictures.

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Buffy’s look, “What’s taking you so long?

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This is a wet-weather creek, meaning the creek can be dry, shallow as above, or so high and fast there’s no crossing it.

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The creek narrows as the elevation gradually increases.

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Ripples create yellow-rimmed shadows.

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Ripples in the ice create the yellow designs and the shadows in between.

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Trees growing along the creek need a strong extensive root system. Heavy rains result in high, fast-moving water.

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Mosses and lichens are quite common on the rocky slopes.

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Yellow ochre results from the iron designs in some of the rocks.

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Obviously, there’s red ochre too.

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This was a fresh spring morning, with birds singing.

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Obviously, this was a beautiful fall day.

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This hill is around the corner in the third picture in this blog. It’s steep, rocky slope makes it difficult to climb up from any direction.

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One time Buffy and I went up to the bluff, then to the left and found these rock designs, called liesagang bands. There were so many that it was a momentous occasion, which I blogged:

 https://naturesnippets.com/2012/05/28/liesegang-bands/

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And … the walk back toward the truck.