Posts Tagged ‘pattern’

Nature’s Artistry

I come from an artistic family and tend to look at things differently than a non-artist does.

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I spent a lot of time this summer watching the large milkweed bugs mature.

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Now that the plant’s all dried and dispersing its seeds, it’s taken on a totally different appearance. Even the angles of the four stems add an artistic element to the design.

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The remaining fluff creates a pattern with their arrangement.

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 Then there’s the intricate design of each seed.

These pictures would look different if they were taken at different times of the day, with different angles of the sun and in different weathers.

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I won’t be posting as many blogs for a while, because I’m now in the beginning stage of shingles.

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A New Snake

My truck took me for a drive to check the Eagle Mountain Road — They had actually worked on it! I still wasn’t sure if I could drive the whole road yet. (My husband and I found out later that the road is downright dangerous!)

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Anyway, there in the road was this brown snake. I didn’t remember seeing one like it before. It stayed frozen in place, even after I drove off. I’m waiting for my oldest son to identify it for me.

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Keith saw my pictures and said it was an eastern hognose. It had apparently just shed. A small patch of the old skin remained on the side just behind the head. What had me confused was its lack of pattern.

Fiery Skipper

Sedums are one of the busiest butterfly/insect attractors in the yard.

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 A male fiery skipper  (Hylephila phyleus) was too busy feeding on the sedums to pay much attention to me.

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It made its way around from one flower to the next. The female’s pattern tends to be darker. Their size ranges between 1.0 – 1.4 inches.

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They don’t call them “skippers” for nothing — some can “skip” out of sight without even seeing them leave.

Thistles … Have Visitors?

What was this crab spider thinking? How did it even get on the tip of this thistle bud?

How can prey get to it?

Thistles have bloomed for a while out in the middle of my weed patch because there’s more sun light there. I’ve been watching the shorter ones growing on the south side of the weed patch. They are getting more sunlight now that the sun’s moving farther south.

The pattern on the buds looks like it’s been stitched, and I’ve photographed it often.

Only tiny insects could crawl around on these plants.

The words hostile environment come to mind.

I checked the spider in the evening, and it was gone. I assumed it lowered itself on a strand of silk … wonder if it lowered itself onto the bud in the first place?

These pictures are from the next evening.

This one was on a different bud. It didn’t like the attention, and

it did a quick side-step, angling downward. It also angled its body outward.  I assumed this posture was meant to threaten me by making itself look bigger.

Then it resumed its patient-waiting position.

I didn’t see the tiny jumping spider at the base of this bud until I saw the picture on the computer. Obviously, thistles have more activity around buds than I expected, and will have even more when they bloom.

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Then I found more interesting things around the thistles this evening. (the next night).

This spider’s pale coloring and faint markings makes me think it recently molted.

Three of the thistles changed dramatically in the last 24 hours. If you look close, about a third of the way up, you’ll see a tiny darkish winged insect.

The prey here looked like maybe a beetle. It was a 16th of an inch at the very most.