Posts Tagged ‘pollinated’

A Honeybee

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A lone honeybee stayed busy gathering pollen in the black ash tree in our backyard.

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It was obvious from the size of its pollen sacs that it was finding plenty to take back to the hive. I wonder how much pollen the sacs can actually hold?

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Ash trees are pollinated by the wind … and maybe with a little help from the honeybee.

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I Wonder …

I wonder if a spring and/or summer starts out dry and goes into a severe drought, if a plant might bloom but not use all of its buds at that time?

What else would explain a small group of flowers on this butterflyweed during first week of September? The plant bloomed in June, but didn’t produce any seedpods.

What would cause these seedpods to start growing when there had been no flowers blooming? Were the earlier flowers pollinated and ready to grow and develop, but the drought was to severe or heat to severe that the seeds wouldn’t have developed right?  (The pods started growing before the above flowers bloomed.)

So, does the plant or is the plant able to postpone in hopes of more conducive weather?

The Accused and the Culprit

Hayfever season affects so many people. The sneezing, watery eyes begin, and all the sufferers see is the profilic bloomer goldenrod. It gets accused for all their suffering. They never notice the actual culprit, the ragweed (Ambrosia sp).

Do you see the ragweed in this picture taken in my backyard?

I rest my case.

Average height of most ragweeds is 6 feet or so. Giant ragweed can reach 17 feet tall! Peterson’s Field Guide to Wildflower shows 31 species. Illinois has 5 species.

Goldenrods (Solidago sp.) grow to 5 feet tall, with Illinois having 25 species.

This picture shows the male ragweed flowers beginning to bloom,

and this one shows them from the underneath side. Ragweed is pollinated by the wind. Insects pollinate the goldenrods.  (The flowers in this picture haven’t started blooming like in the picture above.)

Female flowers are practically hidden in the leaf axils. If you look closely, you can see yellow stamens.

These flowers were pollinated, and the seeds are developing.

Wonder if this holds one or more seeds?

Obviously, goldenrod is attractive to insects and not the cause of hayfever.