Posts Tagged ‘sedum’

Predator – Butterfly

Several pearl crescent butterflies visit the sedum plants in the moon garden.

They concentrate more on eating than watching out for predators.

It’s hard to see from the angle of the camera that there’s a predator behind the wings on the right. This time it’s an ambush bug.

  The ambush bugs are only up to 1/2 inch long, and can change color to match the color of the flower they’re on.

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Mystery Solved

The more I researched this, the more confused I became.

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I found this web stretched in the crotch of a dead pear tree in our backyard. The day was cloudy. I had no idea what the “line” was in the center of the web.

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Then I found a smaller web in a clump of sedum. Obviously, it had the same mystery in the center of it too.

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This was an even closer shot of the center of the web. The silk was so thin it was hard to see.

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I didn’t see a spider in any of these webs until today. The bluish shape on the right, near the center of the picture moved. The spider changed its position in the web. It went out from the center and quickly back. I started taking pictures. It was almost impossible to get a focused picture with the small size of the web. My camera kept focusing on the background instead.

I found a position with the leaves behind and showing the spider. At least I solved the mystery of the spider’s location, and that the other shapes are the spider’s egg cases.

P.S. I have found many of these spider and egg cases scattered around the yard.

 

Sedum Visitors

I’m back! We’ve had company, and they kept me busy a lot of the time. The best medicine after they left was to walk around the yard, checking what and who’s here, and what’s blooming.

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  The monarch butterfly and

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the painted lady both like the sedum.

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The silver-spotted skipper is quite a common skipper. They visit a variety of flowers.

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The clouded Sulphur also likes the sedums. It’s obvious I have a lot of sedum, and a lot of butterflies in a good butterfly year in my gardens.

 I know there’s been others I’ve missed while entertaining company.

A Day-Flying Moth

When is a  bumblebee not a bumblebee?

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…  when it’s a snowberry clearwing moth (Hemaris diffinis).

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They hover to feed at flowers. In this case, it’s a sedum just starting to bloom.

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I hope more will stop for a sip.

A Flutterby

 

I think this was a Delaware skipper.

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It posed for the first picture on the sedum

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and decided to “lift off” for the second one.

Fiery Skipper

Sedums are one of the busiest butterfly/insect attractors in the yard.

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 A male fiery skipper  (Hylephila phyleus) was too busy feeding on the sedums to pay much attention to me.

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It made its way around from one flower to the next. The female’s pattern tends to be darker. Their size ranges between 1.0 – 1.4 inches.

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They don’t call them “skippers” for nothing — some can “skip” out of sight without even seeing them leave.