Posts Tagged ‘silk’

Horizontal Webs

Spider webs are usually vertical.

Obviously, these two are horizontal. The two strands — orange and other blue — are strands of silk that were  let out to hold the web in place. You’ll see a part of the web stretched across to another leaf nearby.

 This picture was taken in the same area as the two above, and at a different time of day.  A light breeze blew the web around, which resulted in the multi-colors reflecting from the web.

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Evening Light

The four following pictures were taken a little before sunset.

The sun reflected off the “ribbons” of the spider’s silk.

It also enhanced the colors,

  giving them the beginning colors of dusk.

 The silk strands moved just enough to “widen” the appearance of their silk and also change the reflecting colors.

Notice the small bands of colors lined up on the silk. The movement of the silk created the tiny reflecting blocks of colors.

Looong Spider Silk

The spiders have been busy the last few days.

I’m not sure what this plant is. It grows near the edge of my small flower garden in the backyard. The two strands in the picture are spider silk.  The spiders let out the silk. The silk strands blow in the breeze until they attach to whatever they come in contact with.

This strand of spider silk probably looks wider from a light breeze blowing it.

 

 

Wood and Webs

I never really thought of spiders as artistic until recently. I am interested in spiders and go out early most mornings looking for their webs.

I find interesting twig frames. Combine an interesting twig frame and spider’s silk…

It looks like this spider was a bit more ambicious.

Look close on this “twig frame” for thin strands of silk. The frame resembles a bird.

I don’t know what the spider had in mind. It looks like a hammock to me.

I first see the eye, then a loooong beak. The silk strands finish the insect’s shape.

… a flame thrower?

This web is actually round and is the first round one I found this year. The breeze changes its shape.

Long Spider Silk

A spider spun the long length of silk above. Actually, it’s all one piece.

This is the same strand of silk as the one above. A slight breeze or air movement moves it and changes how much of the silk is seen.

  The spider silk is flat and easily moves about in the slightest breeze. Movement changes its appearance.

 Each of the pictures has a short white flat strip of spider silk too. It’s in different light from the ones in the sunlight.

(The silk wasn’t twisted like in the bottom picture. I don’t know why it looks like that in the picture.)

Strange Spider Web

This dead pear tree has quite a history.

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Now it houses a spider whose web is about 3 feet high in the tree.

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The silk is so fine the web would be hard to spot if it wasn’t for the “stuff” in it. The “stuff” looks like sawdust. Woodpeckers do visit the tree and “sawdust” would fall when there was activity above … or the spider added it when spinning the web.

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These three pictures of the web weren’t taken on the same day.

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It was an active place when the tree was alive and producing fruit. I have no idea what’s included in the “stuff” in the line … unless it’s somehow young spiders. (They are spider egg cases.)

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The pears would rot and drop when the tree was alive. The rotten fruit then attracted many, many butterflies and other insects  too.

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Red-spotted purple butterflies visited flowers.

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The viceroy resembles a monarch, only the monarch lacks the extra black band on the hindwing.

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Besides the rotten fruit, the hackberry butterflies will also visit animal droppings and carrion.

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A question mark butterfly joined the hackberries. If you look close, you’ll see a faint gold upside-down question mark in the middle of its hindwing.

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The buckeye butterflies have an eye spot on the top of the forewing and two spots of different sizes on their hindwing.

I plan to enjoy the pear tree until it’s all fallen down.

A Morning Surprise … a Big Surprise!

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   I recently started going for mornings walks around our backyard about 7 a.m. to look for spider webs.

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   Then Sunday morning (October 3) I woke to a dense fog. It didn’t take me long to get outside with my camera. I couldn’t see the back of the yard from the house. We have two acres.

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Obviously, there were the “common-shaped” webs. I found ones in all sizes, from the small  ones to ones from three feet in diameter.

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Some weren’t completely finished. This one looked like it came apart near the center.

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This web was in the magnolia tree. It looks like a tangled “mess” that would capture prey.

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How can this web hold its shape with all the multi-sized drops lining every strand?

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I wonder how long silk will remain from the web.

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I saw a few webs like this one up to three feet tall.

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This web is designed to capture insects that enter the separated area.

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I wondered if this web was completed or if it was what remained.

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The hackberry tree above appeared practically covered with webs, especially at the top.

These are only a few of the 240 pictures I took that morning!

What I don’t understand now is, “where did all the spiders go?” Where had all the spiders been before this web-a-thon?  I only found three webs the next morning and one this morning.