Posts Tagged ‘slug’

Close Relatives

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  Slugs and snails are close relatives … a slug is a snail without a shell.

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Both are gastropods,

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and both have tentacles with eyes.

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Snails carry their shell on their back and

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can seal off the opening to keep from drying out.

A Slimy Resident

I found this slug on a leaf of a Solomon’s seal plant.

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A slug is a snail without a shell.

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Slugs live underground where they can remain moist.

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They feed on tender leaves, seedlings, soft fruit, fungus and decaying matter. They breathe through the “hole” in its shell called a mantle.

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Birds, toads and ground beetles are a few of the predators that eat them.

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Slugs are one thing I rarely see, and I wouldn’t have seen this one if it wasn’t for the wet weather.

An Interesting Stick

Our weather finally turned off nice for a change, and I found myself picking up sticks in the yard.

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 I picked up a stick under the sweet gum tree and found two surprises underneath — a small shelf fungi and a slug. The shelf fungi was so small I couldn’t see if the underneath side was smooth or had pores.

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There was no shortage of lichens on the fallen wood. My Missouri book “Walk Softly Upon the Earth” calls this a blister lichen (Physcia stellaris). My “Lichens of the North Woods” book calls it a star rosette lichen.

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Then I found these yellow-green lichens.

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It looked like they’re more yellow when they were young. The black had me confused, because it looked more like a crust than like the top of the smooth black ones above.

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I do get frustrated at times when I’m trying to identify a find and can’t.

For me it’s more of a matter of learning to see, find and enjoy.

Yard Walk-about

Insect numbers have increased lately.

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I’m not sure what a short-horned grasshopper found interesting on the sedum.

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If you look close on the right of the two front petals, you’ll find a small plant hopper.

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Apparently something tried to capture this pearl crescent butterfly.

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A slug slowly made its way around to the back side of the leaf.

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 The  dragonfly sure didn’t pick an attractive perch.

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The crab spider looked like part of the leaf from a distance.

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I couldn’t see through the silk to see if there was either an egg mass or larvae on the white dogwood leaf.

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The spider that spun the nest is to the left partly under the long strands of silk.

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A hanging insect  — in this case a skipper — can mean either a crap spider or ambush bug. From what little that shows, it has to be an ambush bug.

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A moth waiting patiently for the night.

A Slug Discovery

I made an exciting discovery this morning while moving log chunks.

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Three slugs were under one of the pieces of wood.

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These tiny eggs were under the same log. I’d never seen any like them before.

A quick online search for “slug eggs” answered my question.  The website showed that the more transparent ones were newly-layed.

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There was no shortage of roly polys under the wood.

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A grub didn’t like the disturbance and tried to get covered back up. Grubs are immature beetles.

… What are those tiny egg-looking things between the 2 sticks?