Posts Tagged ‘star rosette lichen’

A Small Snow Cave

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A small snow cave partially covers ed blister lichen (Physcia stellaris)  growing on a limb in our dawn redwood tree. It’s also called a star rosette lichen. It’s a foliose lichen — a leafy looking lichen (say that three times fast). They reproduce by spores, which is the black in each disc.

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A New Lichen

One of my lichen books calls these blister lichens. The other one calls them star rosette lichens.

Their scientific name is Physcia stellaris.

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Black is the most common blister lichen I find here in southern Illinois.

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Some blister lichens have brown discs,

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and others have green.

The discs are called apothecia and are where the spores are produced.

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Then I found a blister lichen with gray discs in the backyard yesterday.

Now I wonder what other colors that I might find?

Ice Encrusted

Luckily, a recent ice storm didn’t produce the amount that was forecast.

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A thin layer of ice encrusted most surfaces.

While walking a loop around the backyard, a short dead tree with lots of lichens caught my attention. One of my lichen books calls this a blister lichen, and my other one calls it a star rosette lichen. It also goes by Physcia stellaris. It is commonly found on deciduous trees.

 A lichen is actually two plants living in a symbotic relationship — a  fungi and algae. The fungus provides a moist habitat for the algae to live in, and it also supplies the algae with nutrients as it decomposes the surface it’s growing on.

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Nature has such artistic abilities.

Learning Lichens

 My recent interest has included lichens.

I have two books on lichens — Walk Softly Upon the Earth, published by the Missouri DOC, and Lichens of the North Woods by Joe Walewski.

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The Missouri book has the name blister lichen for this common lichen. Walewski’s book calls it a star rosette lichen.

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 Both use the scientific name Physcia stellaris.

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Spores develop in the disc-shaped fruiting bodies. It commonly grows on deciduous trees.  It’s a foliose lichen, meaning it looks leaflike and has only a few points of attachment to the surface.

 Very few scientific names make it into my permanent memory. Images easily become a visual memory.

That being said, I plan to call this one blister lichen.