Posts Tagged ‘strands’

Evening Light

The four following pictures were taken a little before sunset.

The sun reflected off the “ribbons” of the spider’s silk.

It also enhanced the colors,

  giving them the beginning colors of dusk.

 The silk strands moved just enough to “widen” the appearance of their silk and also change the reflecting colors.

Notice the small bands of colors lined up on the silk. The movement of the silk created the tiny reflecting blocks of colors.

Looong Spider Silk

The spiders have been busy the last few days.

I’m not sure what this plant is. It grows near the edge of my small flower garden in the backyard. The two strands in the picture are spider silk.  The spiders let out the silk. The silk strands blow in the breeze until they attach to whatever they come in contact with.

This strand of spider silk probably looks wider from a light breeze blowing it.

 

 

Morning Dew

A strong storm system went through before sunset last night.

IMG_7757

I went straight to the computer after an early breakfast …

and was shocked at the size of a spider web stretching from the pine tree to a vine on part of my rock pile.

IMG_7759

Teeny beads of dew lined all the strands of the web.

IMG_7768

Clouds didn’t detract from the web’s sparkling appearance.

IMG_7769

The web measured 3 to 4 feet tall … or more.

IMG_7770

I was too fascinated to think about its height.

IMG_7773

I wondered just how long it would take a spider to weave a web of that size.

IMG_7796

The sun came out after I got back in the house, giving me this view,

before the spider “took”  the web down for the day.

Glide in For a Landing … and More

Today started out sounding like spring with a robin loudly singing in our front yard, and a great horned owl hooting to the north.

——-

The kitchen sink isn’t exactly my favorite place to be, but I often see interesting things while there. The window faces west.

IMG_8304 crop

 Strands of silk drifted in on a light breeze and landed close to the porch. The silk measured approximately 3 1/4 inches long.

IMG_8308 crop

I first suspected an adult spider had spun it because of the size of the silk … only adult spiders wouldn’t do this.  Spiderlings produce silk but don’t build a web.

IMG_8306 crop

 Maybe it was the spiderling of a larger species of spider. Today turned out to be a sunny day with the temperature reaching 67. An eastern phoebe repeated its name in the backyard this afternoon.

So…. our days finally look and feel much more like spring is here in southern Illinois!

—————–

The spiders had a surprise waiting for me in the evening.

IMG_8314

 The sun was getting lower, and I noticed spider silk reflecting the sunlight. I hurried out in the front yard with my camera.

IMG_8315

A light breeze added movement to the single strands of silk.

IMG_8320

The camera seemed to have a mind of its own as to how the pictures turned out.

IMG_8328

 I just snapped and snapped pictures with the light quickly changing.

IMG_8336

Then I noticed the dramatic effect on the other side of the highway. I stood on our hill and zoomed in for closer pictures of across the road. The speed of the sun lowering in the sky didn’t give me much time to do anything but quickly snap pictures. The reflected light shimmered with a light breeze.

Everywhere I looked, and as far as I could see, there were strands of spider silk.

IMG_8340

The breezes moved the spiderlings’ strands in the trees, grass and other dried vegetation.

I took thirty-eight pictures in eleven minutes before the sun sank to the horizon.

Then, when I remembered to check the next day, every bit of the spiders’ silk was gone.

I can’t imagine what the sky looked like with so many ballooning spiderlings! I sure wish I’d seen it!