Posts Tagged ‘wings’

What a Surprise Part 2

I went out in the yard the next evening, and there lay a luna moth on the ground. I didn’t see any movement.

Another one lay close by. It didn’t move any either.

None of the ones I saw moved. I walked to the backyard after taking all the pictures I needed.

Then … another surprise … I walked on down in the backyard, and there were the wings of another luna moth.

None of the wings were attached.

There was no body either.

It looked like the wings fell off.

These were all that was left of the moth. It must have burrowed in the ground to complete its transformation.

Lots of Dragonflies

Sorry about the quality of these pictures. The subjects didn’t land and pose.

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A short storm came through a little earlier. I came in to the computer, looked out the picture window and saw dragonflies flying 10 to 15 feet high over our backyard. They flew fast, flew only when the sun was shining, and didn’t land.

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According to my dragonfly books, they’re wandering gliders, are two inches long, and their range includes the U.S. and southern Canada. I was lucky to get the close-up on the one above. All I saw of them was their orange color.

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   They prefer temporary ponds and puddles in the open with bare spots and short vegetation. Here they were flying back and forth over our backyard.

They are the only dragonfly found around the world except for Europe.

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 Early in the evening, I saw lots of them across the highway, flying over the mowed area and over the corn. I stayed on our side of the highway to watch and photograph them. The early evening light shadowed the side of the corn and tree, making it easier to see the dragonflies.

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Like I said, they were fast flyers!  I’d just hold the camera on certain areas and snap the picture when several flew across the cameras’ field of view. A lot of the pictures didn’t turn out; others would if I snapped the picture in time. There are six in the picture above. There wasn’t any aiming the camera. I’d just hold the camera and wait for them to fly by.

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There are four in this picture.

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They flew so fast that their wings didn’t show in a lot of the pictures.

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I had to wonder what the people driving by thought about me standing out there aiming a camera across the highway.

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Wandering gliders are a medium-sized dragonfly, almost two inches long. Their hindwings are triangular and broad at the base. This allows them to fly around for hours.

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They feed mostly on aerial plankton.

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They have been gone two days now, and I really miss them. This was my first encounter with them … and I hope not the last.

 

No Name Dragonfly

For some reason, I find dragonflies that I’m unable to identify.

I still enjoy them immensely.

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This one liked the exposed perch of the copper trellis.

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The wing veins look so delicate and intricate … and downright fascinating.

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The dragonfly and damselfly numbers are low this summer. At least I can see a few daily, not like the butterflies … I haven’t seen one in the last few weeks.

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It would fly out to capture tiny flying insects.

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This angle shows all the details of its body except the dark tips of its wings.

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This picture shows a lot of details of its anatomy. Interesting. I couldn’t find out what the parts are that I see in its head.

 

 

Reflected Color

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I thought this was such a pleasing picture with the wings of female blue dasher dragonfly reflecting a hint of red from the roses.

The rose is a miniature rose, a family heirloom. My great grandfather bought it for my grandmother, when my mother was born (1929).

Growing Wings?

Now I’ve seen everything!

I was taking pictures of a beetle

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on the bark

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of the Ingram Hill Oak.

Then I looked down …

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and found wings coming out the side of the tree.

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There was no body attached or any damage to the wings.

They just looked like they were growing out the side of the tree.

Eastern Amberwing

So dainty, so cute and usually not so cooperative.

Eastern amberwings, a dragonfly, are just under an inch long. This one is a male. The female’s clear wings are marked with brown and amber. They prefer still water of ponds and lakes, or slowly moving ditches and stream pools.